Makoto Aida continued

I looked briefly at Makoto Aida’s work here. Exploring his role in “Bye Bye Kitty” and his work. In doing this research I came across these images…

 

Aida is what I consider an activist photographer. Although he might not think it himself his work comments on the society he lives in a provokes change. Making the spectator question what they except as normal.

Japanese artist Makoto Aida used the form to make a biting commentary on how manga and anime objectifies the female form by drawing eyes on model’s breasts. When it’s not, the medium is people barely dodging a police fine for public indecency.
– http://kotaku.com/makoto-aida/

Kawaii is the dominant culture in Japan. How do you combat this or incorporate it in order to keep your work interesting?
It is a strange thing to say, but I did grow up among what they call “kawaii culture.” I say strange as we all take it for granted. I guess we’ve been exposed to such [kawaii] images without even realizing it. They are everywhere so, it’s always been in my subconscious. I do not take this whole thing too negatively, but still I am a man, I am not fanatically into what is considered kawaii in general. I guess you could say that I do incorporate the idea, or what I consider kawaii into my work unconsciously.
– http://hifructose.com/2012/12/19/exclusive-interview-with-makoto-aida/

Aida is known for his paintings rather than his photographs. It is hard to find text and information on his photographs, I will scouer the internet and try my best. If I can’t find anything I will have to put my own analysis skills to test.

 

An interview with Makoto Aida

Makoto Aida’s name is unavoidable when researching work that opposes consumption in Japanese culture. Aswel as being featured in “Bye Bye Kitty: Between Heaven and Hell in contemporary Japanes art” he is a key figure in the Japanese art scene, and his name appears everywhere.

This is an Interview with Makoto Aida from the Bye Bye Kitty exhibition

It’s interesting that Makoto Aida considers himself as a “Conceptual Artist” rather than a painter, his work does cross over multiple platforms.

When asked about his depiction of young girls he says…
“I believe there is an abundance of problematic points in the current generation of Japanese society and Japanese mentality”

“In a simpler manner there is one reason; after Japan lost the war Japanese people became people who were left without fatherly and patriarchal existences. This includes the fact that the Japanese Self-Defence Forces are not a proper army… I believe that there haven’t been many incidents in history where a nation has been in such denial of masculinity and become so feminine. Wether for better or worse, maybe if the whole world were Japan it would be in peace”

“I want to further expose Japans twisted parts”

“I would like people to know there are many active artists out there other than just Takashi Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara.”

I want to look more into Makoto Aida’s photographs, although he isn’t as well known for them as his paintings, they intrigue me and a I want to know more.

https://i2.wp.com/beautifuldecay.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/photo02-sma_l.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/www.buamai.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/kc4.jpg
Left photo, “Body Painting with Koe in Stockholm” 2004

Right photo, “Girls Don’t Cry” 2004

Aida eschews irony to delve into the underbelly of his country’s booming culture industry; he exposes the edges where the fabric unravels to reveal something else — not quite an alternative, but a glimpse of something unsettling, reminding us that all is not well below the shiny happy surface.” – http://beautifuldecay.com/2009/03/25/makoto-aida/ March 25, 2009 by 

There is a documentaru about Makoto Aida in which he is followed around. It’s called….

Makoto Aida: Cynic in the Playground

This is the trailer, I will be ordering the DVD soon and writing up a review.

Jason Horowitz

Jason Horowitz photographs offer a unique view of the body. His intrusive extreme close ups can be seen as grotesque yet fascinating at the same time. The prints are very large, each frame occupying up to a wall size. Looking at the body at this size and intensity reveals or sorts of textures and fibres which we do not see. Brilliant work which puts us the viewer in a slightly awkward position.

Leif Podhajsky

“Leif is an artist and Creative Director. His work explores themes of connectedness, the relevance of nature and the psychedelic or altered experience. By utilizing these subjects he attempts to coerce the viewer into a realignment with themselves and their surroundings.” – taken from his website

His work is really aesthetically beautiful and clever, I know the fashion images won’t look much like this but it’s good to see how other people are using the same theme.

COAGULATED PHYSIQUE

This design was made for Diesel 55 t-shirt series

Most of this work is based around sexual acts, there are some other images in this series which make this clear. For example the image at the top is called Organic Orgy, and if you look closely you can see sexual acts taking place in some of these images.