Printed Figurine

Today I awoke to an exciting text message telling me my figurine was ready to be picked up from the basement in Graham Sutherland. I was very excited to see it and couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. It was presented to me and I was confused at first, the figurine was surrounded in a plastic waxy substance, the technicians put me at ease once they told me that is to be washed away. The figurine is also slightly smaller than I originally wanted but due to the Universities 3D printing facilities it is the biggest I could get it.

The next step was to soak the figurine in cold water, I did so for about an hour before starting to clean it.

On the technicians advice I used a tooth brush and scrubbed the figurine, this took just over an hour but was strangely therapeutic and relaxing. I took a video of myself cleaning the figurine for around 10 minutes, I found it really hard when doing research to see any videos on the post production of 3D printing i.e. cleaning, prepping and painting so I thought I would make a video which anyone could access and not have the problems I had.

The figurine still has a rough texture on the back half so I will leave it in soak over night and scrub it again tomorrow, then it will be ready for painting.

Ryoko Suzuki continued

I have looked at Ryoko Suzuki’s series on Kawaii. But she has 2 other projects would be a great example of activism photography.

Anikora

My ANIKORA series is acting in front of social background, of a growing trend in Japan, known as “aikora”: it is about Japanese men’s desire to see their favorite pop or movie stars in pin-up or nude poses.The ANIKORA series ironizes such masculine desire. The figures featured in these works have almost nude bodies of an exaggerated perfection, like all anime characters. But by exchanging the original face of these virtual identities with my own, real face, I am showing a critical, human position about a (globally) increasing indifference towards some of our desires, leading to a situation of external control.

http://www.ryokobo.com/contents/anikora.html

Screen Shot 2013-01-03 at 16.33.23

Sweat7 2002

ANIKORA-SEIFUKU

The second, ANIKORA-SEIFUKU series, developed afterwards, shows girl figures wearing several types of uniforms that are commonly seen in Japanese animations (“Manga”). I was wondering why a figure in such a uniform (made especially for teenage girls) looks more seductive to adult men than the same figures in a state of nudity.I came to the conclusion that this kind of specific social effect only exists for men, and for a time the girls being a certain age – reflecting a uniformed, female image they can control. I felt I had to take a close look at this and work towards this situation.

– http://www.ryokobo.com/contents/anikora2.html

ANIKORA-SEIFUKU 01. 2007
ANIKORA-SEIFUKU 03. 2007
ANIKORA-SEIFUKU 04. 2007

ANIKORA KAWAII

Japan is a country submerged in“cuteness”.
I have been surrounded with“cute”things since childhood and thus they seem natural,but I have come to believe this“cuteness”is unique to Japan.
ANIKORA series Three takes“cuteness”as a sub-theme.
Along with ANIKORA series 1 and series 2,the purpose of these works is to investigate the desire of men to see“anime”or cartoon characters of young women with child-like face and improbably voluptuous bodieis. It is easy to see how men’s desires are reflected in these characters, but less so how this way of seeing women is expressed in Japan’s culture of“cute”things.
Women who are immersed in the culture of “cuteness”define themselves and present themselves to society as objects of “cuteness”. Being“cute”is the most important value for Japanese young women. But aren’t they losing themselves and their own identities and personalities by trying to become objects of masculine society’s desire for“cuteness”?

– http://www.ryokobo.com/contents/anikora3.html

ANIKORA-KAWAII 08. 2009
ANIKORA-KAWAII 03. 2009
ANIKORA-KAWAII 02. 2009

 

 

 

 

 

Approaching Otaku’s

After getting little response from my online posts about ‘Moe’ I have decided to take a different approach, and to look for some Otaku’s and contact them directly instead of letting the come to me.

I have contacted a few more sites like otakunews.com to see if I can get my project proposal publicised. I’ve noticed a lot of people post pictures of their rooms up on deviantART the problem I’m facing is no one is form the UK.

by ~OvermanXAN Philippines

bMastershambler US

by DrunkenAnt US

by Ishtarl-Demonic-Fox Australia

After looking through 200 photos on deviantART I have discovered none of them are from england. These are good references for doing this project abroad whilst I travel over the years, but I need to find someone in the UK. I cannot be discouraged, I know there are Otaku’s in the UK I just need to find them.

Danny Choo (THE blogger about otaku culture) blogged about the world most stylish Otaku Room. Danny Choo get’s a lot of his inseration from www.figure.fm they have a whole room section of their blog, might be worth looking through them to see if anyone from the UK has applied.

I failed to find any UK participants but I did find this…

Are you a Nendoroid or scaled figurines collector as well? Come join us @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/382107865139012/ because we are one as well! Join the community to interact with lots of other collectors and share release news as well! Cya there!

I have requested to joining the FB group and hopefully will find someone on their who will want to participate.

In my quest for an Otaku sanctuary I have found some on figure.fm, and contacted them about the project. Hopefully at least one will want to get involved.

These are some pictures the people I have contacted posted…