Phubu talks to Graham Macindoe

Graham Macindoe was a guest lecturer in the 2012 Phonar course, and returned this week to talk to our Phubu (The progress of Raw Format Exit show). His personal stories and experiences adds depth to his work, see below for my live notes made on Twitter during the talk.

You can watch the lecture here…

  1. @grahammacindoe. I photographed myself with whatever I could lay my hands on – during drug and alcohol problems #phonar #Rawfmt
  2. In the life I was in there was a lot of detachment. That’s why I’m trying to show. #Rawfmt #Phonar @grahammacindoe talking about his work.
  3. “What you see is what you can interpret it to be” @grahammacindoe talking about his images. #phonar #Rawfmt
  4. #Rawfmt #Phonar “I Always like to make the viewer think beyond the photograph”
  5. Missing persons by @grahammacindoe was covered by the new york times! Press follows where #phonar leads. #phubu
  6. @grahammacindoe keeping notes from times past to aid the visual memoir, revisit these notes-can lead to interesting view points of a project
  7. “I think I can put everything together to make a powerful body of work” – @grahammacindoe #Rawfmt #Phonar #phubu
  8. “…just taking pictures on the streets to get my eyes exercised” @grahammacindoe, #rawfmt #phubu

Spencer Murphey for Phonar – the 4th look

*Included in Symposium too because it may become relevant*

This is the lecture we had today with Spencer Murphey, visual culture & film lecturer at Coventry University, for Phonar.

And here are my notes…

The idea of the “4th gaze” is a really important thing to consider, the ability to use a media to make the spectator reflect upon themselves through your work is a skill which is key for any artist. The constant questioning of yourself and of others, and what we expect as normal.

After the lecture we also had a question and answer session with Spencer and a question came up about when does your work become self-indulgent and have no relationship to anyone else, its meaningless?

Spencer replied with Lazwel’s theory, when creating work think about…

Who?
Say’s What?
To Whom?
in what platform?
with what effect?

Obviously this isn’t a check list you should comply to in every project, but when you start to question your work it’s good to step back and use these methods to get back on track. There is no doubt I have been worried about this project, so I want to try and describe my project through these terms.

Who?
Myself
Says What?
The exploration of otaku culture through the insight into their “Sanctuaries”.
To Whom?
To the online geek culture, as well as a broader audience who might not understand this obsession.
In what platform?
Online, to access my target audience and provoke some sense of debate/opinion.
With what effect?
To break away from prejudice and the patronising work of most who look at sub cultures.

It seems I need more of a platform, how am I going to approach this? a blog, a series of stills, audio, video? I need to contextualise my idea more and look at some examples to see which would best fit my idea.

Brian Palmer Talk

Here are my lecture notes for Brian Palmer’s Talk with phonar. It’s a really interesting story.

Hear the talk here phonar.covmedia.co.uk

And here are my notes….

  1. DaisyWareJarret
    #phonar conversation with #BrianPalmer my stories were people based stories.

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:26:27
  2. DaisyWareJarret
    in 2002 I left CNN, being in front of the camera isn’t really where I wanted to be #BrianPalmer #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:31:00
  3. mimchs
    “Digital was transforming the landscape.” Brian Palmer #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:31:51
  4. DaisyWareJarret
    The American market had much less of an apetite for pictures of daily life stories under occupation #BrianPalmer #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:33:07
  5. DaisyWareJarret
    “the bang bang” – war photography in america through #BrianPalmer’s eyes #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:34:53
  6. DaisyWareJarret
    I’m not doing the story america wants. We want is good vs bad, my work was more about 24 year olds interacting with civilians #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:38:00
  7. DaisyWareJarret
    I couldn’t develop the story in the time. So by the 3rd trip I was shooting mostly video. #phonar #BrianPalmer

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:40:20
  8. DaisyWareJarret
    I have a responsibility to tell the story as well as I can. But I’m not perfect. #Phonar #Iraq #BrianPalmer

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:41:34
  9. GeneaBailey
    #phonar brian palmer passed up on a 1/4 of £1 million deal because he wouldn’t have a say in what happened to his work

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:41:19
  10. Jenniz8
    When you sign over your footage you sign over your rights #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:40:55
  11. DaisyWareJarret
    Producers are conscious of audience, you end up with mainstream journalism that doesn’t challenge and is almost self congratulatory #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:44:17
  12. DaisyWareJarret
    useful = conscious of the needs of the people i’m writing about. These are people that are more than consumers #BrianPalmer #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:45:53
  13. DaisyWareJarret
    We were documenting political theatre. The essence is to be transparent about the agreements that you form. #BrianPalmer #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:50:30
  14. DaisyWareJarret
    Transparency. Integrity. Independence. #TheKey #BrianPalmer #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:50:49
  15. DaisyWareJarret
    Since I could not eat my integrity it was not a nutritious meal. I had to learn from others. #BrianPalmer #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:52:39
  16. hlnbck
    pick your apples, don’t wait for them to fall! #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:51:56
  17. DaisyWareJarret
    Sitting in peoples living rooms made the story, not just gathering quotes. The story has to develop organically. #Phonar #BrianPalmer

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:59:01
  18. DaisyWareJarret
    To tell someones story you need to show up and have respect. #BrianPalmer #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 01:59:51
  19. DaisyWareJarret
    I don’t just want to find out who this guy was, I want to write him and his community back into history. #FamilyHistory #BrianPalmer #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 02:02:47
  20. riajoynes
    understanding the history really helps to connect to the narrative. #phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 02:02:10
  21. DaisyWareJarret
    Being property (slaves), Owning property, Having it taken away. Extraordinary exploration into #BrianPalmer’s Family History #Phonar

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 02:04:01
  22. O_Sharpe
    #phonar talk. Brian Palmer. looking for UK based practitioners to track down owners of his great granddad

    Wed, Nov 14 2012 02:03:57

Brian Palmer’s story is a really strong yet sensitive one, and exploration into his own family could open up many doors, wether they be good or bad. I love the idea that going to physically interact with your subject takes the story to a more intimate level.

50 shades of grey lecture notes. #Phonar

Today’s Phonar lecture was on 50 shade of Grey. At first my thoughts were, how does this relate to photography, but as the lecture began to unfold I quickly learnt that there are many aspect of 50 shade’s impact, promotion, publishing and use of the ‘fan’ that I as a photographer could learn from.

Phonar is about a community and freeing up our work rights in order to collaborate. Rather than keeping everything copyrighted and shutting ourselves off to the greater world we should be sharing our ideas and information, creating a network of contributors and fellow practitioners. The idea of E.L. James’ 50 shades series of books steamed from her love for twilight. As a fan she partook in the ever growing community of online fan fiction and used her skills to re-present the love story of Edward and Bella. Some may argue that as practitioners we do this in all our work, taking influence from other peoples work wether it be colour, narrative, composition or any other aspects that draw us to a certain piece of art, nothing is 100% original anymore. But this isn’t a negative thing.

Tapping into a community that bases itself on our interests seems like a natural development in life, but sometimes we need that extra push. Phonar for example is a fan base for all photographers to access new ideas and projects allowing them to meet the worldwide photography community. Much like 50 shades stems from twilight, courses like Phonar stem from a passion of photography.

As a self proclaimed fan myself I found it interesting listening to Mafalda’s concept on audience and community. Whilst some people might see 50 shades as pornography other people might not. Almost everyone is a fan of something, a religion, a place, a TV show or a game. We pump money, effort and time into areas/hobbies not so that we can make money back (that was never E.L. James’ intention) but to share with other people in our obsessions. For me personally it is Anime/Manga and Japanese pop culture, I am a convention goer, and I spend hours online (some people would think wasted) researching specific characters or products relating to my obsession. We have been asked to key into a specific audience, reach the fans and collaborate with them, maybe do a project on them or interview them. Whichever method is chosen it is the best way to learn and grow. This time last year E.L. James was a fan, and now she is a best selling author, she produced her best piece of writing, not because she had to but because she wanted to, it’s her passion and she knew online was the best place to reach other people who were interested. For these reasons I hope to tap into the cosplay community. I have briefly scratched the surface, photographing at events, arranging studio sessions and joining forums.

This video is a great explanation fo fandom 🙂