‘Porcelain Figurines’ by Martin Klimas

Using a sound activated shutter release (a technique most associated with the work of Harold Edgerton) Martin Klimas has created this stunning series which suspends time and objects.

What I find most intriguing about this series is how through destruction the porcelain figures appear to come alive and are full of movement. Although we know they are being dropped and smashed the figures look like they are almost rising up and breaking out of their confines.

There is a great skill in these images too, Klimas has created images that could never be reproduced, each figure breaks in a unique way and within microseconds of these images being made the objects exist only as a pile of porcelain on the floor. There is something quite beautiful in the idea of life through destruction.

Saying all of this, I think these images would be even better as real sculptures, the beauty and intricacy would be breathtaking.

Check out the full series here.

John Olson – 70’s Rock stars at home with their parents for LIFE magazine

John Olson worked with LIFE magazine to smash all the preconceptions and “coolness” of rockstars – photographing them with their parents at home – we see independent, iconic and untouchable idols brought down to a human level, no longer rock gods. This project is very humbling and despite being made in the early 70’s is a theme that is still current and interesting.

Joshua Scott

Joshua Scott’s website doesn’t provide any information on his work or whats it about which is slightly annoying. However it does allow me to read his images without being positioned by the text. (It’s interesting how lost I feel without any information)

www.joshuascottphoto.com

Locker Notes

 

Locker notes is a very kitsche series, saturating us with colour and aesthetics, unrealistically portraying the contents of an American (we asume from the style of lockers) teenagers locker, but the over done use of objects and colour makes a comment on the mass consumption of popular culture and modern society.

 

Other Still Life

 

 

These pieces by Joshua Scott remind me of Andy Warhols work on marilyn. Representing the less pretty, more destructive side to celebrity and the ageing and death of icons which are considered modern day gods.

Andy Warhols reaction to Marilyn Monroe’s death