Astronauts and Dinosaurs: sci-fi/consumerism art by Scott Listfield

American artist Scott Listfield’s Astronaut Dinosaur series is a breath of fresh air in the world of traditional painting (even though the series started in 1999) tackling pop culture and consumerism in using a traditional art method.

No one explains the series better than Listfield himself…

I paint astronauts and, sometimes, dinosaurs.

Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey was released in 1968, well before I was born, so I have no firsthand knowledge of how it was received. I don’t know if people really believed we’d be living in space in 2001, if we’d have robot butlers and flying cars, geodesic lunar homes, and genetically reconstituted dinosaurs helping or eating us. But from Lost in Space to the Jetsons to Jurassic Park, it seems that popular culture has fostered this space-age perception of the future. Generations raised on these TV shows, movies, comic books, and novels are now grown and living in a future filled with mini vans, Starbucks, iPads, and Hip Hop videos. In many ways, the year 2001 failed to live up to expectations. And yet the world today is peculiar in ways unimagined in 1957, when Sputnik was launched, or in 1968, when 2001 was released, or even in 1994, at the dawn of the internet. The present is in fact a very unusual place, and it’s strangest in the ubiquity of things we take for granted.

The astronaut in my paintings is simply here to explore the present.

‘Text Talk’ by Nick Knight

Prolific fashion photographer Nick Knight is constantly re-defining and discussing pop culture in his work, never has this been more true than in ‘Text Talk’, an editorial created for Garage Magazine in 2012. With styling by Katy England and modelling by Lindsey Wixon Nick Knight combines the recognisable imagery of texting and uses them in a way that is reminiscint of Roy Lichtenstein’s work to create a modern take on pop culture.

‘Color Games’ by Julius Lse

Julius Lse‘s series ‘Color Games’ is a triptych of colour and contrast, combining paint, light and the camera to create these surreal deadpan portraits. Very creative and beautiful.

Airbrush: Heiko Weiß
Models: Anni Fast/ Micky Kurz/ Franziska Hiltl

See more here.

THE BEST OF: San – Princess Mononoke

San, the wolf-raised female warrior makes for a great cosplay. She’s a visual delight – a mix between masculine and feminine and an alternative for girls who don’t want to wear skimpy outfit’s or be “kawaii”. These cosplayers bring the Studio Ghibli heroine from the flat screen into our world.

See more of the best cosplay here.

Reversed Music Icons Fandom Project by Butcher Billy

Butcher Billy’s project ‘Reversed Music Icons Fandom‘ is a graphic designers version of time travel, what if the influncer becomes the influenced? This is an idea Butcher Billy explores through the used of band tee’s, an apparel which is common amongst music fans. It’s a great idea and a lovely graphic based project. Check out the images and Butcher Billy’s statement:

This is a series that reverses the natural course of pop culture hierarchy – the influencer will sport the shirt of the influenced – completely messing with space time continuum and raising the question: What if the most influential rock icons in pop culture history met, when alive or in an early stage of their careers, the new acts that came decades after inspired by their own legacy?

Giorno Giovanna (Jo Jo’s)

With the iconic fetishised colours and atmosphere of Jo Jo’s Bizarre Adventure – Giorno cosplayers and photographers have no excuse when it comes to stylising. Saturated colours, romanticism and flowers create the perfect look for this unique character. Below are 4 cosplayers that have done a pretty good job at bringing the characters and the style off the pages and into reality.

‘Badass’ fan art by Tohad

deviantArt legend Tohad has been creating ‘Badass’ fan art, taking pop culture icons and turning them on their heads, it’s an idea that has been done but never in this way. Tohad keeps the cartoon nature and bright colours, creating a collection of badass characters presented in similar ways. Props to Tohad, I love this series.

Decotora by Tatsuki Masaru

In the summer of 1988 Tatsuki Masaru spent time with Japanese truckers who take part in the unique culture of decorating their trucks – DECOTORA. Masaru explores how they used decorating to turn a job that was perhaps an ends to a means into a hobby and passion they loved. Like all subcultures the dedication and devotion these truckers have is mind blowing and fascinating.

Interchangeable Icons

TOKYO, 2013

21st Century Geisha, Magical Girl and Product Placement. These are all “looks” of our protagonist. Female pop cult icons change their visual identity in order to comply with whichever product or theme is in demand.  They become like dolls boundlessly changing whilst simultaneously being branded as unique and liberating. Consumers are led into a false sense of empowerment, told we are free to choose how these icons look, when really we are being drip fed options. Our so called freedom is choosing from a series of pre-selected branded looks which demand we pay before getting access. This transcends into all aspects of consumerism surrounding these transmedia icons, figures, photos and trading cards all offer different variations, we buy into choices in order to show we don’t conform. When the act of needing them suggests the opposite.