‘Porcelain Figurines’ by Martin Klimas

Using a sound activated shutter release (a technique most associated with the work of Harold Edgerton) Martin Klimas has created this stunning series which suspends time and objects.

What I find most intriguing about this series is how through destruction the porcelain figures appear to come alive and are full of movement. Although we know they are being dropped and smashed the figures look like they are almost rising up and breaking out of their confines.

There is a great skill in these images too, Klimas has created images that could never be reproduced, each figure breaks in a unique way and within microseconds of these images being made the objects exist only as a pile of porcelain on the floor. There is something quite beautiful in the idea of life through destruction.

Saying all of this, I think these images would be even better as real sculptures, the beauty and intricacy would be breathtaking.

Check out the full series here.

‘Text Talk’ by Nick Knight

Prolific fashion photographer Nick Knight is constantly re-defining and discussing pop culture in his work, never has this been more true than in ‘Text Talk’, an editorial created for Garage Magazine in 2012. With styling by Katy England and modelling by Lindsey Wixon Nick Knight combines the recognisable imagery of texting and uses them in a way that is reminiscint of Roy Lichtenstein’s work to create a modern take on pop culture.

Tokyo Special 1/10 – Tokyo Nights by Jon Siegel

Exactly one year ago I had just checked into my hotel in Tokyo along with my mum. The 10 days trip was a life changing one and I think about the city I love daily. For every day I was in Tokyo I will bring you a different photo series of the city, each photographer show casing their own view of an element unique to the city.

Seeing as we arrived as nightfall it’s only fair to start with the time in which Tokyo is at it’s best, night time.

This is part 1 – Tokyo Nights by Jon Siegel

I love the tones and colours used in this series, although we know it’s dark the city is still vibrant and energetic in its colours. The salary man having his dinner, the youth dressed to go out and the taxi man working on the roads of this eccentric city, Jon Siegel captures Tokyo from a non-alien view. Check out the full series here which comprises of over 170 photographs.

Mixing Black – Sun City Poms by Todd Antony

Often photographers and editors have a hard time choosing the black shade of black they want for an image, like painters some photographers avoid using absolute blacks due to the contrast and unrealistic feel, obviously this technique is only applied to relevant projects, some are enhanced by using absolute black. We rarely as people experience the colour black unless it’s man made, even our shadows aren’t absolute black.

Rather than simply hinting towards a colour Todd Antony completely changes his dark areas in this project Sun City Poms, when this technique is applied in the right circumstances it can make a photograph, this is one of those times making the images soft and quite flat, almost like sports cards and complimenting the bright colours.

Decotora by Tatsuki Masaru

In the summer of 1988 Tatsuki Masaru spent time with Japanese truckers who take part in the unique culture of decorating their trucks – DECOTORA. Masaru explores how they used decorating to turn a job that was perhaps an ends to a means into a hobby and passion they loved. Like all subcultures the dedication and devotion these truckers have is mind blowing and fascinating.

Depicting a journey

The key to depicting a journey is not through the strength of 1 image, but a series of images. Here are some examples of what I mean.

Nan Goldin

‘Gilles and Gotscho’

I use this series a lot in my research projects, but thats because it’s impact has never worn off. When depicting a journey Nan Goldin has such an intimate relationship with not only the people but her photos that they immerse you in the Journey she is experiencing, even if she isn’t in the photos.

As individual images they are still powerful, but as a series they grip the audience in a different way. Much like a book make you wants to turn the next page, Goldins work makes you want to see more. We become involved in the journey of these two men and feel emotional attached to them

This is an example of an emotional journey, for the purposes of my project I am now going to look at a series of physical journey images.

Paul Graham

‘A1 – The great north road’

We looked at this series in photo book club last year. It’s a series of images taken between 1981 and 1982 of people and places on the A1. Paul Graham the photographer spent a lot of his childhood travelling up and down the A1 so this project is very personal to him. The A1 is considered to be the back bone of the UK, connecting the north and the south. They places along the A1 however aren’t taken notice of, they are temporary stop off points for truck drivers and families.

As a series it makes me stop and think about all these places I have driven past and never taken a moment to stop and reflect. And although the series was made before I was born, I know I have been to places like this recently. Making these photos timeless, they depict a place which never expands, it is always there just doing it’s job, which in todays society is quite refreshing a comforting to see.

polaroids

I recently acquired a polaroid camera, and since i have got it, I have wanted to produce a polaroid series. However I don’t want to do the hipster thing and use it to document how “awesome” my life is.

This polaroid camera got put to the back of my mind until today, when I found 10 polaroid sheets for 1.50. I saw this as a sign, I must do this project.

But what do i photograph? what series of images would benefit the effects of a polaroid camera?

For a while in my head I have though about a series which I have yet to name, this is a series of people in wigs, I want to produce close up images of people in wigs that make them anonymous. When I went to my first Anime Con it fascinated me how normal everyone was under their costumes, most had office jobs and brown hair, this was their escape and hobby. in my mind i picture 10 polaroids, each with a different person wearing one of their wigs, but all thats in the frame is the hair that might have been missed when putting on the wig. No identity or context just a hair line which is being desperately hidden by the wig.

The reason I want to take these images on polaroid is because its disposable, just like their identities they consume at the weekend.

Lets begin the nameless series…

Re-think, let’s begin the series called…

Weekend Heroes

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