Modern Couples by Carlotta Cardana

Italian photographer Carlotta Cardana explores multiple themes in her ongoing series ‘Modern Couples’ – firstly- subcultures, in particular 2014’s take on the 1960’s British mod movement. Carlotta photographs quirky couples who ooze class and sophistication. Another theme Carlotta explores is relationships and how two people can blend to become almost one.

The most intriguing theme Carlotta talks about is the freedom she gave to each couple, allowing them to style themselves and choose a location, on her site she talks about how she wanted to look beyond the clothing and get the couples to project themselves through their image.

It’s a lovely series that surreally immerses us into a vintage version of our modern age, it seems so detached from “reality”. What I love is the stillness throughout the series – although each couple is uniquely different the images (like her take on relationships) almost become one, this is due to Carlotta’s brilliant editing and how she maintained a deadpean-esque feel that lets the clothes, objects and environment speak for the couples.

See all of Carlotta’s work here.

Skill trading with Gimlong Minature Painters

Gimlong Minature Painters are a Coventry based figurine painting company who mainly specialise in miniature figurines but their work is so beautiful and colourful I wanted them to paint my figurine.

I contacted Rachel AKA Gimlong Minature Painters and offered her a trade of skills. Due to having already spent over 100 on the figurine I was keen to save money, so I made an offer, in exchange for her painting my figurine I would spend a day in the studio creating a portfolio of her work. She was excited about the exchange and we are going ahead with it. Here is some of Rachels past work.

Praktica at Twilight

I have been shooting with my Ilford sportsman recently with the intention to use it in Tokyo to shoot my final pieces, however I thought it would be best to take a back up camera just in case one gets stolen lost or breaks. So I opted for my second favoured film camera, My Praktica, it used to belong to my mum but she gave it to me when I gained an interest in photography. I used it a few times in first year but have rarely used it since.

However to my surprise I found it a lot better to work with, and more realiable that the ilford. Using my iPhone light meter app, I learned from the last 3 shoots I have done and took the reading so the vibrant lights were at level 5. The images and colours are a lot better than the ilford ones, the camera and myself just work better, it is less clunky and has more option for adapting. I also love the light glare it creates, something which the ilford does not.

I will now be using the Praktica as my primary camera and the ilford as my back up. I am also very impressed with the accuracy of the light meter app on my phone but will take a normal light meter to Tokyo as backup.

Twilight with Ilford Sportsman round 2

Round 2 with the 1960’s Ilford Sportsman, I think using a tripod made so much difference, I had to consider the positioning more, at first I was weary of the cameras shutter being so stiff that the images would still be shaky but they turned out nice and still. I love the colours this camera gives off, light doesn’t bleed to much into another surface, it remains quite contrasted which will work really well with the city lights in Tokyo. The images are a little under exposed. if I want to maintain this contrast between darkness and coloured lights I will need to make sure my subject in the photographs is lit well, maybe standing near a window or using a torch on my phone to make them stand out. The images have a blue quality to them, this is probably the cameras white balance default, as it is unchangeable but I think it works really well especially against the contrasting colours like yellow, orange and red, I need to be selective in the areas I choose to shoot and make sure the lighting is orange toned rather than blue. The images are better than last time, but still need to get a better control over the light, and pre-visualise the images before I take it.

The left side of this images is really nice, but I need to balance it out with the right, a simple street flood light would balance the image well and make it less underexposed.

 

Interchangeable Icons

TOKYO, 2013

21st Century Geisha, Magical Girl and Product Placement. These are all “looks” of our protagonist. Female pop cult icons change their visual identity in order to comply with whichever product or theme is in demand.  They become like dolls boundlessly changing whilst simultaneously being branded as unique and liberating. Consumers are led into a false sense of empowerment, told we are free to choose how these icons look, when really we are being drip fed options. Our so called freedom is choosing from a series of pre-selected branded looks which demand we pay before getting access. This transcends into all aspects of consumerism surrounding these transmedia icons, figures, photos and trading cards all offer different variations, we buy into choices in order to show we don’t conform. When the act of needing them suggests the opposite.

Digital Rest

UK, 2012

We live in a society in which we passively communicate, and whilst many people see this as a negative thing, I don’t. I made this series to portray the emotion and comfort technology can bring us in relationships, long distance ones in particular. Each Image is named after the singular light source used in the image.

1 day left

There is one day left to submit your work to #PHOTOGRAPHY magazine. Issue 3 will be released in December but entries sent in after today will be considered for Issue 4.

We accept all form of photography, to see the standards please read Issue 1 or 2 . http://hashtagphotographymagazine.com/readthemag.html

We also have specific features and a competition for Issue 3.

Features:

“Photography Influenced by Art”

Art has influenced photography since its birth,
and although some people regard them as two
completely different mediums, we don’t. That’s why we
want to see your work that is influenced by art, or that
uses the techniques of a specific art movement.

 

“Toy Camera”

It is our belief that it doesn’t matter how much money
you have or how much your equipment cost you,
a talented photographer can produce interesting and
thought provoking images with even the cheapest of
cameras. So this is our challenge to you, using your toy
camera produce an image/aseries of images which prove
money can’t buy talent.

For anyone who isn’t sure toy cameras are simple
inexpensive film cameras, such as Holga or Lomo.

 Competition:

“Story”

We love a good narrative at #PHOTOGRAPHY, for the
issue 3 competition we want you to take a line from your
favourite book and interpret it in an image/short series of
images. Submit your finished image to us along with the
quote it was based on and we’ll choose a winner 20th
October 🙂


Apply here: www.hashtagphotographymagazine.com

Document my Journey to school…

I wanted to talk a bit about the lighting before you see the pictures. I made a conscious decision to have more faith in my abilities and set up the lighting prior to taking any photos. I knew I wanted a soft light because it would compliment the fold in the paper well, for this reason I used my bed side tabled lamp. Fearing it would still be to aggressive on the delicate and intricate origami I decided I would reflect the light onto the paper by using a mirror. All set up and I was ready to go, and to my delight the lighting turned out just how I imagined it, strong enough to create interesting shadows and make the origami have depth, whilst not being so harsh the images become agressive.

Time for the images…

Origami Me

This project looks at my journey to where I am now in my school life. My last year. I have always loved being in the education system, this series is a visual story of how school and university has helped me to grow and become more confident. Daisy.

At the current point in my education this is where I am. A nearly fully bloomed flowers. Hoping the next year will push me to become this…

Depicting a journey

The key to depicting a journey is not through the strength of 1 image, but a series of images. Here are some examples of what I mean.

Nan Goldin

‘Gilles and Gotscho’

I use this series a lot in my research projects, but thats because it’s impact has never worn off. When depicting a journey Nan Goldin has such an intimate relationship with not only the people but her photos that they immerse you in the Journey she is experiencing, even if she isn’t in the photos.

As individual images they are still powerful, but as a series they grip the audience in a different way. Much like a book make you wants to turn the next page, Goldins work makes you want to see more. We become involved in the journey of these two men and feel emotional attached to them

This is an example of an emotional journey, for the purposes of my project I am now going to look at a series of physical journey images.

Paul Graham

‘A1 – The great north road’

We looked at this series in photo book club last year. It’s a series of images taken between 1981 and 1982 of people and places on the A1. Paul Graham the photographer spent a lot of his childhood travelling up and down the A1 so this project is very personal to him. The A1 is considered to be the back bone of the UK, connecting the north and the south. They places along the A1 however aren’t taken notice of, they are temporary stop off points for truck drivers and families.

As a series it makes me stop and think about all these places I have driven past and never taken a moment to stop and reflect. And although the series was made before I was born, I know I have been to places like this recently. Making these photos timeless, they depict a place which never expands, it is always there just doing it’s job, which in todays society is quite refreshing a comforting to see.

#PHOTOGRAPHY Issue 3

Issue 3 is Due for release in December 2012, for the mean time take a look at the cover & don’t forget to submit your work by 20th october.

Image by Beethy – http://beethy.deviantart.com/

www.hashtagphotographymagazine.com

Here’s a list of features and comps you can apply too…

Features:

“Photography Influenced by Art”

Art has influenced photography since its birth,
and although some people regard them as two
completely different mediums, we don’t. That’s why we
want to see your work that is influenced by art, or that
uses the techniques of a specific art movement.

“Toy Camera”

It is our belief that it doesn’t matter how much money
you have or how much your equipment cost you,
a talented photographer can produce interesting and
thought provoking images with even the cheapest of
cameras. So this is our challenge to you, using your toy
camera produce an image/aseries of images which prove
money can’t buy talent.

For anyone who isn’t sure toy cameras are simple
inexpensive film cameras, such as Holga or Lomo.

Competition:

“Story”

We love a good narrative at #PHOTOGRAPHY, for the
issue 3 competition we want you to take a line from your
favourite book and interpret it in an image/short series of
images. Submit your finished image to us along with the
quote it was based on and we’ll choose a winner 20th
October 🙂